Charter Challenge: Civil Liberties And The Erosion Of Canadian Culture

Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms, founded by former prime minister Pierre Trudeau, is the most transformative piece of legislation in modern Canadian history.

Entrenched into our constitution in 1982, the Charter’s transformative nature is found not in its declaration of personal liberty and equality, but rather in how the legislation is utilized, and by whom. Surely, few Canadians oppose laws which guarantee individual rights such as freedom of speech, or freedom of assembly. The extension of these rights to all Canadians, regardless of race or religion, is very likely acceptable to the average Canadian— whether a recent arrival to our shores, or a descendent of those who farmed our prairie lands at the turn of the 20th century.

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National Post View: Playing politics with terror

Does the threat of “terror tourism” warrant limiting Canadians’ mobility rights? Conservative Leader Stephen Harper would appear to think so. At a campaign stop in Ottawa over the weekend, Harper promised new legislation to designate certain parts of the globe under the control of terrorist …

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August 4, 2015– Netherlands abandoning multiculturalism

Famously progressive and permissive Holland has tried multiculturalism and decided that it just doesn’t work.  In a historic reversal, the Dutch are abandoning government policies in support of multiculturalism and demanding intregration and acceptance of Dutch values from immigrants, mostly Muslims, who now constitute 6 …

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