1971-2021: Fifty Years Of Multicultural Damage To Anglophone Canadians

The year 2021 marks the 50th anniversary of multiculturalism in Canada. It’s founder, ex-Liberal Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, entrenched diversity ideology within our society in the year 1971.

Beginning its existence as non-legislated social theory, multiculturalism became institutionalized in 1988 with the passing of the Multicultural Act of Canada.

One reason to take a critical look at this nation-transforming phenomenon is simple: it has never been done before. This in itself is one of Canada’s great mysteries.

Next to immigration to Canada, multicultural policy is the most socially transformative piece of legislation in history. Odd it is that the number of critiques within media in the past half-century can be counted on one hand— or perhaps less.

Both young Canadians and millions of migrants to Canada may be unaware that previous to diversity policy, our country maintained what was known as bi-cultural English and French-Canadian identity.

In 1971, Pierre Trudeau rid our nation of this definition. Of his own personal volition and devoid of public input, Trudeau replaced bi-culturalism with multiculturalism.

Naturally, the social impact took time to manifest. It was not until official legislation that political ramifications resulted. The Multicultural Act resulted in a transfer of hundreds of millions of dollars to ethnic not-for-profit organizations. These groups were instructed to utilize these tax-payer funds to promote language, culture and religious holidays from their previous homelands within society.

The goal inherent was to elevate 3rd World communities to a level equal to that of Canada’s founding peoples—English, French, as well as subsequent arrivals from European countries.

To state that the initiative has been a success is a massive under-statement. This phenomenon has grown into a “game-changer” of giant proportions.

Perhaps in theory, Pierre Trudeau’s “gift” to society was well-intentioned. The tangible outcome, however, is another story. Somewhere along its five decade path, multiculturalism took a sharp left-hand turn into a political weapon.

Weapons are instruments used in battle. The battle which transpired has been one of leveraging diversity policy to attain social and political power. Even the term “multi” is suspect. This connotes many, myriad, multiple— which in no way encapsulates present-day multiculturalism.

In reality, it is the property of what one may call “the big three”— Chinese, Sikh and Muslim Canada. At best, this can be referred to as  “tri-culturalism.”

There is more, in the form of the following: Diversity has for 50 years been advanced as a policy of “inclusion.” Yet, in real terms, it has been nothing of the sort. If true inclusiveness existed in this regard, why are Canadians of European heritage perpetually on the “outside looking in?”

Even more curious is the fact that in 2021, organized diversity results in a vilification of an identifiable community—Anglophone Canadians. This is found in endless accusations of “systemic racism”— the Trudeau government’s catch-all phrase for white on non-white community oppression.

No wonder mainstream media have thus far refrained from waxing philosophical on the 50-year anniversary of diversity policy in Canada.

Simply stated, multiculturalism has never provided a single benefit for Anglophone or Christian Canadians.

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What we have here is certainly one of the most peculiar social circumstances in Canadian history:

— A policy with an intention of community equitability that in reality results in discrimination against a specific community.

— A perpetual absence of media analysis of one of the most impactful social policies in history.

— A policy intended for all which ended up functioning as a political power tool for the largest, best organized, and wealthiest “minority” communities.

In a way, its difficult to blame those who have been leveraging multiculturalism for so many decades. After all, if it was not for Pierre Trudeau, it is likely the policy wouldn’t exist.

Which brings us to his off-spring and current prime minister, Justin Trudeau. There is no question that he is individual most responsible for the diversity “power-grab” within contemporary Canada.

The irony is palpable: Trudeau Jr.’s multicultural mania has in fact, fragmented society as never before. His behaviour has pitted community against community. By elevating 3rd World Canada while disparaging “Old Stock” communities, Trudeau has sown seeds of societal division.

Despite media obfuscation, the anger among Old Stock Canadians is a sight to behold. This we witness not on CBC or in the Globe & Mail, but rather within social media formats which have eaten away at media market share for the past decade.

Despite what media—or anyone else who tries to convince the public otherwise– Justin Trudeau is the great divider of Canadian society. 

Diversity is sacrosanct within Canada. It is immutable, and written-in-stone. While our nation has changed all around it, there it remains— a rock of social policy.

And changes there have been. One of which is the slow and steady path of the Anglophone peoples of Canada to a bona-fide minority community. Within three decades, this status will become a reality. Will these folks suddenly find themselves welcomed into the diversity fold upon official minority status?

Cultural Action Party say this will never occur. Therefore, the end game is in reality a massive transition of power from 1st World Canada to 3rd World Canada. No political figure in history has done more to facilitate this transformation than current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

— Brad Salzberg, CAP Founder(est. 2016)

2 thoughts on “1971-2021: Fifty Years Of Multicultural Damage To Anglophone Canadians”

  1. Brad Salzberg is right on point. Always love his articles– he never ceases to amaze me with his truth on what really goes on in Justin’s world.

    Reply

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